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20131028
20131105
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, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
and probably don't like his anti-russian foreign policy. >> they were looking for a change, but we do have a new man looking to pursue close ties with russia and the west. do you think that dual course is possible? >> well, i think that mikheil saakashvili will have to choose. he may not be loyal to rushe splittic -- russia politically. he'll continue his own foreign policy. he's been manoeuvring between russia and the west. if he's serious about joining the european union, they will require him to worsen relations with russia. that happened with ukraine. i don't see how it will be avoided by georgia. >> you think he'll have to choose, he can't pursue both tracks? >> if the foreign policy of the european union changes, and sees russia as a threat tore competitor, it will be a very happy one for everyone, because then georgia will be able to develop close ties with russia and the rest of europe. right now the stans of the european union is anti-rush j. and the media. >> what overtures will russia make to the new leadership to try to improve ties? >> already tourism started between russia an
that shaped to their view of how american foreign policy should work. >> when was john foster dulles secretary of state? >> both of them came to power at the same time. they were sworn in immediately after president eisenhower took office in 1953. it was the only time in american history that siblings had controlled the overt and covert sides of foreign policy. >> you have a second part of your book about six monsters. i have the pictures here. the first one is mossadegh. if i could get a brief synopsis about who they are. >> in 1821, john quincy adams made a famous speech on the fourth of july. he said, america does not go abroad in search of monsters to destroy. but the dulles brothers did. they were carrying out a secret world war even at a time when we thought we were at peace. they went after six monsters, six figures that they found evil in the world. the first was prime minister mossadegh of iran who they overthrew that year. the next year, they overthrew president arbenz in guatemala. the next year, they launched an operation against ho chi minh. that failed miserably and was the opera
their positions, foreign policy. russian foreign policy, policy toward the united states from ssian ambassador himself and -- i don't need to introduce them. everybody knows. ambassador pickering and pfifer.or we will try to make this as informal as possible. which makes sense. we'll have like five or seven minutes for each of you to speak, and then if you want to ask questions, i'm sure you have asked questions of each other many, many times in your life, but now you can do it with microphones. we have two microphones here in the room. if you want to ask a question, have you to come to those microphones for your questions. it will be recorded by six men. so adjust your seats. if you would like to ask a question, i suggest you move now closer to the microphone, otherwise you have to go past so many people and wait in line for the microphone. what about russian-u.s. relations? in ink we all enjoy drama the u.s.-russian relations. you need the drama. when there is no drama, we try to find one. it is like an interesting ong-time game to play. if you look at the reality, what's going on between tw
blowers. >> reporter: the allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policies with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelation from snowdon and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. >> reporter: but congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is that the nsa has saved thousands of lives not just in the usa but france, germany, and throughout europe. >> reporter: former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> our over all surveillance abilities are important and need to be preserved. >> reporter: and it remains to be seen if that careful diplomacy will go over so smoothly with lawmakers on their three-day visit to washington this week. >> al jazeera, we're live in washington, and the white house has yet to respond to the latest report of spying to world leaders? >> reporter: not officially. we have a briefing coming up in just over an hour
outer liberal economic policies and probably they don't like he is anti-russian foreign policy and at a certain moment he will have to choose because, yes, he made the capitol in russia but he will continue his own foreign policy and so far he has been maneuvering between russia and the west. but if he is serious about joining the european union or having associate membership, the union will require him to worsen relations with russia and that happened to ukraine and not avoided by georgia. >> in the uk the defunct news of the world newspaper rebecca brooks and kandi corazon are in court to stand trial on phone hacking charges so let's go to roy who is outside of the court in london and tell us what is going to happen, roary. >> reporter: david, this starts with a bang on the first day is mostly procedural so we are likely to see the swearing in of the jury and we will get an outline really of how the trial is going to proceed. we won't actually have much of the nitty gritty of the trial or evidence or anything like that on the first day. we will see the defendants in court. 8
strategy in the iranian foreign policy. the essential question is did sanctions work? >> it's difficult to come up with an explanation as to why it is in the presidential elections six of the seven candidates criticized the previous negotiator. unless there was some impact sanctions were having on the debate in iran. it's difficult to see why it is his focus on the economy would have been so successful unless the sanctions were having some impact in iran's economy. it's difficult to see why it is that after several years which iran seemed entirely uninterested in a nuclear deal we have a new nuclear negotiating team that is obviously interested in reaching a deal as quickly as possible. unless the sanctions were having some impact on iran. and i think one of the people whose opinion we should listen to in the matter is mr. -- who said repeatedly the sanction we're having a dramatic impact on iran. and it change and approach was necessary. so from the perspective of the obama administration, -- as i have written several monograph. the obama team from the beginning always thought the sanc
, american foreign policy towards syria. the meeting, the deputy prime minister re-engagement with elements of the assad regime and shows americans deep involved and engagement in pushing for a political settlement inside syria. interesting developments there. i want to move on and talk about the meeting between peace envoy lakhdar brahimi, who was expected to hold talks with president assad. lakhdar brahimi says he has seen assad playing a role in a new syria, but not as a leader. do you think this is something assad is likely to agree to? >> not at all. in fact, not only assad would not agree to what mr lakhdar brahimi publicly stated, lakhdar brahimi yesterday tried to distance himself from his own announcement on syrian television, saying the statement was taken out of context. president assad warned lakhdar brahimi to stay faithful to his mission, not to make any statements outside of his mission. the reality is that there is a stalemate in the syrian crisis. the reality is the syrian opposition is divided. the assad regime is not going to make a compromise or really give the oppositio
around the world with world leaders. in fact, -- every foreign policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. and just two weeks ago i was honored to travel to asia with senator kerry where we pushed forward key administration initiatives like the trans-pacific partnership. our nation is very lucky to have someone with secretary carries knowledge, and global reach in this leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, a man who has dedicated his life to serve the united states and a tireless can do later who is tackling the tough global issues facing our world. lease help me welcome my friend, secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. thank you very, very much. thanks so much. thank you, penny, for an extraordinary introduction, and based on that introduction i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. i'm out of that now. i'll tell you, about a couple months, b
it sooner? in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? it is harder than ever and might be impossible. >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian embassy to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able --
is my question. sooner?'t we do it in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able to issue them. if i may continue,
in asia. asia is the focal point of this administration's foreign policy. the pivot we have discussed frequently. withrip will be in keeping intense focus the president has brought to bear on our relationships in the region and on our presence in the region. this will be a continuation of the work the president has done. that the president looks forward to speaking with the vice president about the trip before he goes and getting a readout on his return. according to a news report, nsa has several [indiscernible] beijing and hong kong. will this be an issue between the vice president and his counterparts in china? comment on specific reported intelligence gathering activities. what i am confident of is when the vice president travels and has meetings with counterparts in foreign countries that every topic is on the table. he said get back to us on the answer to that, is the president rolling out fundraising for any and credit super pac for the coming cycle? >> i have not had a single conversation about 2014. you and get back to you to the extent we have answers on these questions. but
summit, ceos talk about the investment climate and the policies to attract foreign investment. some of those include immigration and energy. it is moderated by valerie jarrett. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. secretary lew, secretary pritzker, thank you so much for your very excellent remarks. and i want to thank both of them for their leadership. they have been outstanding, particularly for the subject matter that we have before us these next two days. i know that their insights, particularly as it applies to the business community, are very valuable to all of us that are joining us today. we're off to a great start to what promises to be a great conference with a packed agenda. thanks to all of you who have come great distances to be with us today. i am very pleased to announce our first panel, which is entitled why select the usa?: perspectives on investing and operating in the united states. this is going to be a very informative and valuable discussion and it is also my pleasure to introduce the moderator of this panel, an important member of president obama's white house
intelligence or suspected foreign agents. >> one major point was made to surveillance policies, saying everybody else is doing it too. they claim some of the information came from nato allies, not u.s. spying. greece has admitted to spying on the u.s. and others in the 1990's at the hearing. james clapper made it clear the u.s. is in good company. >> you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> he said the white house was aware the n.s.a. oversees eavesdropping all along, but may not have known specifics. >> russian leaders denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last months g-20 summit. the report by two italian newspapers say delegates were given memory sticks and phone chargers equipped with spyware. it's unclear how many leaders received the bags or used the free bees. >> edward snowden can earn a ticket out of russia if he testifies about spying. germany are investigating report
or public in on the senate foreign relations committee said today that he is embarrassed by the obama administration's policy on syria and a lack of support to the syrian opposition. bob corker was addressing the ambassador to syria at this hearing. it includes an update on efforts to transfer syria's chemical weapons to international control. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> this hearing of the senate foreign relations on syria will come to order. we have two panels today. first panel is robert ford, ambassador to syria, the assistant administrator for the bureau of democracy atu assistant for international security and nonproliferation. our second panel we will have alabaster -- an ambassador for the center of the atlantic council. we welcome you all. i look forward in this hearing to hear your respective on the realities we face in syria, the state of play, the progress we have made, and where we go from here strategically, especially given the catastrophic human a tearing crisis that is spreading a
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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